Call For Artist Submissions – Shevchenko Month Bookmark

Every March, the Shevchenko Foundation commemorates the work of poet Taras Shevchenko by distributing thousands of bookmarks to children across Canada who are enrolled in Ukrainian language classes in public, private, and Saturday schools. All Ukrainian dance schools and ensembles also receive this souvenir art piece miniature, which for some has become a collector’s item.

We ask for artists to create an art piece that depicts the chosen literary excerpt from Shevchenko’s poems. This year’s excerpt is from the poem “To N. Markevich”-  “Бандуристе, орле сизий…”/ “Bandurist, my blue-grey eagle…”. The original Ukrainian-language version, and English translation appear below.

The selected artwork will be used in the 2021 March campaign. The successful artist will receive $1,000.00 for the original artwork selected.

The image should be suitable in its dimensions to be reproduced as a bookmark i.e. long and narrow.  The finished bookmark size is 2” x 7.5”.  Please ensure that there is room around your image in case it needs to be cropped slightly. Scans should be a minimum of 400dpi.

These campaigns have become successful educational tools from the Shevchenko Foundation. They also serve as a great venue for exposing the artist to a very large audience. If you are interested get in touch with our office toll free: 1-866-524-5314 or email [email protected]

The deadline for submissions of artwork for the March Campaign bookmark is

January 15, 2021.

 

Н. МАРКЕВИЧУ

(Бандуристе, орле сизий)

 

Бандуристе, орле сизий,

Добре тобі, брате!

Маєш крила, маєш силу,

Є коли літати!

Тепер лети в Україну,

Тебе виглядають;

Полетів би за тобою,

Та хто привітає?

 

Тарас Шевченко, 1840 Петербург

 

 

 

 

TO N. MARKEVICH

 

Bandurist, my blue-grey eagle,

Your fortunes can soar high!

For you have wings, and you have strength,

And time in which to fly.

They wait for you in our Ukraine –

There fly with vigour free!

I, too, would fly along with you,

But who would welcome me?

 

Taras Shevchenko, 1840 St. Petersburg

Translated by C.H. Andrusyshen